Ultralow doses of THC found to protect the brain

A study published in July 2014 by The Adelson Center for the Biology of Addictive Diseases and The Mauerberger Chair in Neuropharmacology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel found that doses of THC low enough to not cause psychotropic activity were enough to protect mice brains from long term damage. In this study, mice were treated with a chemical that causes inflammation in the brain (lipopolysccharide, or “LPS”). Mice that received a single ultralow dose of THC either 48 hours before the LPS treatment or 1-7 days after LPS treatment, and given an object recognition test a few weeks later. LPS causes long-lasting cognitive damage, but the mice who had been treated with THC did not show that damage. Read the full study here.

These states could legalize marijuana in 2014 and beyond
(source: http://fusion.net/justice/story/states-legalize-marijuana-2014-1027175)
In 2012, Washington and Colorado both voted to legalize the sale, possession, and cultivation of cannabis. This year, Oregon, Alaska, and Washington DC will have legalization on the ballot, and Florida will vote on medical use. 

These states could legalize marijuana in 2014 and beyond

(source: http://fusion.net/justice/story/states-legalize-marijuana-2014-1027175)

In 2012, Washington and Colorado both voted to legalize the sale, possession, and cultivation of cannabis. This year, Oregon, Alaska, and Washington DC will have legalization on the ballot, and Florida will vote on medical use. 

(source)

Scientists at the University of South Florida’s Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute have investigated the potential role of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a major component of marijuana, on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology. What is most commonly known as a recreational substance has demonstrated its potential in ameliorating AD and other neurological diseases, perhaps because our bodies produce the substance naturally (endocannabinoids) and have receptors that naturally respond to it. - See more at: http://inventorspot.com/articles/thc-cannibis-has-potential-therapeutic-effects-alzheimers-diseas#sthash.a9TbLYkw.dpuf

(source)

Scientists at the University of South Florida’s Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute have investigated the potential role of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a major component of marijuana, on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology. What is most commonly known as a recreational substance has demonstrated its potential in ameliorating AD and other neurological diseases, perhaps because our bodies produce the substance naturally (endocannabinoids) and have receptors that naturally respond to it. - See more at: http://inventorspot.com/articles/thc-cannibis-has-potential-therapeutic-effects-alzheimers-diseas#sthash.a9TbLYkw.dpuf

MPP looks at SB 1262

For regulatory bill, two steps forward, one step back

Sen. Lou Correa’s regulatory bill, SB 1262, continued to advance through the Assembly when the Committee on Public Safety passed the bill on a vote of 6-1 late in June. The bill will next be considered by the Assembly Appropriations Committee in mid-August. Should it pass Appropriations, the bill will have a short deadline before the clock runs out — requiring a vote on the Assembly floor, followed by a concurrence vote in the Senate.

Sen. Correa’s bill would establish a regulatory framework for businesses similar to the majority of medical cannabis states. The bill has been revised many times since its introduction in February, and for the most part those changes have been positive. What was once an unworkable, harmful bill is now much more practical, but it has been flawed since the beginning. Most recently, Assembly Member Tom Ammiano contributed many big improvements, but the bill took a step back when it was amended due to intense lobbying efforts by the League of California Cities and the California Police Chiefs Association. Changes were introduced that increased licensing fees, banned collectives from accepting medical marijuana donations from members, and law enforcement was granted sweeping authority to deny business licenses under vague circumstances. For a detailed look at MPP’s position on the bill, click here.

These and other troubling provisions are now the subject of intense negotiations, and it is too early to know if they will remain in the bill. If you haven’t done so already,please ask your Assembly member to help improve the bill before it is heard by the Appropriations Committee. And you can sign up for MPP’s free email alerts on California to receive updates on marijuana policy reform efforts in the state.

(source: http://www.mpp.org/states/california/ )

norml's Medical Marijuana in America: the Map

Currently in the United States, 35 states have reformed their laws via legislation or binding voter ballot initiative to allow qualified patients medical access to cannabis products. This time last year, 21 states and the District of Columbia had medical cannabis laws on the books—a sixty percent increase in a single year.


The laws today governing medical cannabis at the state level breakdown to three basic categories: Self-preservation (patient has medical necessity defense for possessing or growing cannabis); Retail access (patient can access cannabis in retail store; home cultivation is often prohibited) and CBD-only (patients are allowed to possess and use cannabis strains and other products high in cannabidiol [CBD], although generally there is no legal source for the patients to obtain those strains; no home cultivation allowed).

norml's Medical Marijuana in America: the Map

Currently in the United States, 35 states have reformed their laws via legislation or binding voter ballot initiative to allow qualified patients medical access to cannabis products. This time last year, 21 states and the District of Columbia had medical cannabis laws on the books—a sixty percent increase in a single year.

The laws today governing medical cannabis at the state level breakdown to three basic categories: Self-preservation (patient has medical necessity defense for possessing or growing cannabis); Retail access (patient can access cannabis in retail store; home cultivation is often prohibited) and CBD-only (patients are allowed to possess and use cannabis strains and other products high in cannabidiol [CBD], although generally there is no legal source for the patients to obtain those strains; no home cultivation allowed).